event

Scarcity in Abundance: Hunger in the United States

The General Board of Church and Society's called seminar for 2018 will focus on issues of hunger in the United States.


On December 15, 2017 the United Nations Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and inequality, Philip Alston, released his report on the United States. This report stated that despite the great wealth in the U.S., there also exists great poverty and inequality. For some, this report came as a surprise (U.S. ranks 36th in the world for access to clean water and sanitation, neglected tropical diseases are becoming increasingly common- rise of hookworm in Lowndes County, Alabama, in 2013 infant mortality in the U.S. was the highest in the developed world, etc.,) while for others it was an affirmation of what we have been witnessing in our communities, in our churches and in our homes.

On September 5-7, 2018 the General Board of Church and Society will be hosting its third annual called-seminar. This year’s called-seminar, “Scarcity in Abundance: Hunger in the United States” is a three day seminar to address one of the facets of poverty; the issue of hunger, in the United States. At the seminar participants will hear about the:

  • impact of hunger in rural, suburban, urban communities;
  • impact of hunger on women and children,
  • impact of hunger on health,
  • impact of hunger on marginalized communities,
  • racial wealth gap
  • “re-thinking” food ministries
  • impact of policies on hunger
  • (optional) meeting with members of Congress

There will also be time for worship, bible study and opportunities to connect with other United Methodists that are passionate about ending hunger in a land of abundance.

Seminar registration includes lunch and costs $200 per person with housing (in a shared room) or $75 without housing. A discount is given if you attend the seminar with other members from your church. Each participant will have to register separately. Scholarships are available. If you would like a scholarship, please contact Aimee Hong at ahong@umcjustice.org